Posts Tagged ‘capital punishment’


Guest blog by Prashanth Kagali:
Rape means, “the crime, typically committed by a man, of forcing another person to have sexual intercourse with the offender against their will.”
I am a positive person and would love to inspire people and get inspired from them. But I have no idea how to inspire a girl who is raped. I feel shame even to approach considering the resentment she would be having against men, which is perfectly right on her part.
When fathers are raping their own daughters, there is no way a girl can trust any man. Even animals would not do this kind of heinous act. As the above definition goes, rape is something that is forced onto another person, against their will. Being a guy if someone forces me to do a simple thing as eating something, which is against my will, I reject it in the strongest of terms. I may never understand what a girl goes through and how it feels for her when someone rapes her, but forcing someone against their will even for smallest of things is just not respecting that person what he or she is.
What needs to be done?
Enough is written about the Rape incidents and its good people are talking and writing more about it. We always have to address the root cause of any problem. Here is where the education comes into picture. Education means not only what is taught at school but also at home. Parents have to teach their male children how to respect girls and how to treat them.
If only these Rape incidents have to end, then every parent should handover their son, a rapist, to the police and ensure strict action is taken. Tell me, how many parents or sisters or brothers would treat their sons or brothers with the same anger as they treat with any other rapist? It’s all about taking a stand.
We cannot live peacefully in a world if one tries to dominate the other. It’s all about giving respect to the other sex. Men need to be educated about the pain that girls goes through when they are raped. No matter what law is passed and what punishment is granted, rape can never be eliminated unless rapists exercise self-control.
I don’t get the idea of movies showing rape scenes. According to me it doesn’t make any sense. Rape scenes should be banned in movies. These rape scenes clearly show that men can exercise control over women. May be this is also in some way helping the rapists. Passing a single law or legislation or holding committees or giving death sentences can never eliminate rape. As we all know how death sentences are given in India. If the amount of time and money spent on deciding whether to give death sentence to Kasab is any indication then you can imagine what would be the case in these rape incidents.
Women deserve respect and it’s a shame that they have to fight for it even today.
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Guest post by Priyanjana:

Dear Sir,

 

I am an out-station student who studied in Delhi and would like to pen my opinion. Sir, there are hardly any woman I know who has not been subject to harassment at least once. Finding someone who has been harassed just once will be the ‘rarest of the rare’ case, as you would call it.

 

Sir, what is happening in Delhi today is a collective frustration of every girl who feels helpless and they are protesting against the ineffective laws that render them helpless and vulnerable. I have grown up hearing how unsafe Delhi is for women and I don’t want my next generation to grow up hearing the same thing and accepting it as a part of their culture and social taboo.

 

I have seen it is very convenient for people to blame it on one word- provoking. I fail to understand what exactly is provocative to men? Whether it’s the clothes that were provoking or the time at which they were out in the street that was provoking or the fact that her character is loose that provoked them. I clearly do not understand what provokes men, even if she is a sex worker, she has the right not to get raped. So, your men who think they can get away with such excuses should clearly be made to think again, sir.

 

How difficult is it, sir, to ensure effective policing?

I heard your interview the other day and it is disheartening to hear the Delhi Police commissioner saying that girls must not be out post 3 am in the night. A promise to ensure safety at any hour in the night would have been really satisfying to hear. By a promise, I do not mean an empty promise but a promise that you would work towards and make happen.

 

Sir, when so many students are protesting and want to voice their opinion, why is it necessary to shell out tear gases and use water cannons? Why can the opinions not be voiced, the problems of the people not considered and safety be ensured? Sir, are we supposed to carry on being submissive and not be taken care of because men get provoked? As the Police Commissioner, Sir, it is expected from you to break this myth, to change the mindset, to not allow any more injustice to happen, to take up the responsibility of the city, to never let history repeat, to implement the laws effectively and strictly so that next time a man thinks of harassing any woman he is forced to change the way he thinks, to ensure a safer future and set an example.

 

I would not dive into the statistics and wait for more rapes to happen so that the number gets stronger so that it becomes important enough for the matter to be taken seriously.

Let Delhi set an example and other cities will follow.

 

Sir, on behalf of all the women, I urge you to take effective steps, to increase police patrols in the dark stretches of Delhi, to tighten security in the night, ensure all the helplines are working, to make sure every metro and every bus has a guard, to ensure every police man is gender sensitized and to entrust safety with regular follow ups.

 

This is what we simply want, promise us this and then you can roll your tear gases bombs back.


Guest Post by Abhay Chawla (journalist) on his 1st meeting with Sonali:

This was the moment I was dreading, coming face to face with her. I tried to mentally prepare myself for the meeting. From the photograph I had seen in the newspapers, I knew Sonali was badly burnt due to the acid attack on her but a flesh and blood meeting is different. Could she see? Could she hear properly? What would I say when I saw her? Where would I look while talking to her? These and other questions were running through my mind.

Sonali came into my life one morning recently, in the form of a story run by a major news channel. When she had been 18 years old, three boys in her locality in Dhanbad had thrown acid on her face. It was nine years since the day of the attack. The boys had been arrested and later freed on bail and the court case still dragged on. Meanwhile Sonali’s life came to an abrupt halt as did the life of her family. 22 surgeries later she is still nowhere with no governmental or organized help coming her way.Instinctively, I knew I had to do something for her. The best I could immediately do was to set up a Facebook group and appeal for monetary assistance. I figured relief and rehabilitation was the first task and for that money was important. This would ensure her surgeries carried on, and somehow I felt that it would show Sonali that people of the country cared and that she was not alone. By evening that day “Help Sonali Mukherjee from Dhanbad” group was 500 people strong and growing. Donations had also started coming in with people messaging their support and contribution.The next day I walked into the temple in south Delhi where she was staying. As I had already spoken to her she was expecting me. Sitting alone on a cot in a small shed at the rear of the temple she was staring at empty space. “Sonali!” I called out loud with gusto. “Bhaiya!” she answered in an equally upbeat tone, smiling and looking in my direction. For a girl who had gone through so much in such a short span of time, she was extremely cheerful and positive. We didn’t know each other, had never met earlier but we connected. Was it because of an earlier life connection, I wondered.

I looked at her and I think I was staring. The acid had eaten both her eyes and one external ear. Her face was being reconstructed with plastic surgeries. Besides this her hands and neck also bore the marks of the attack. Looking at her I felt anger and frustration with the system for not being able to ameliorate her suffering or to give her any justice. I felt miserable on seeing that in a big city like Delhi she didn’t even have a decent place to stay, and in spite of her story narrated by a prominent TV channel no organisation, corporate or individual had stepped forward to give her even a comfortable accommodation.

We talked and the conversation was easy. She told me of the various surgeries she went through and how she progressed since the day of her attack. The number of people she met and the assurances she received. I steered clear of the attackers lest old wound reopen, but told her about my innumerable students who had expressed sympathy and shared their pocket money. She seemed to lapse into deep thought. “I am so happy you came and when you tell me about sympathy and support from people, I feel energetic and want to continue my fight to live.” she whispered back.

It has been over a week. Donations are trickling in as are assurances and media people. She still has to get a decent accommodation or a proper road map for rehabilitation and a future. Meanwhile, a proposal to make acid attack a separate criminal offence punishable by a maximum of ten years and compensation for the acid attack victims by the government has been approved by the Union Cabinet. It is still a long way from being incorporated as a law and then we will have to see how the law is enforced. But the first baby step has been taken.


‘Eve-teasing’ is an Indian term used for sexual harassment of women in public places, and is widely popular in Sub-continent. As women we all have  suffered from this menace at some point in our life and we all know its damaging effects on our psyche.

There is judicial activism going on by many NGO’s fighting for gender equality  to bring eve teasing as a separate head of liability under the Law of Torts so that punishment for this breach of women’s dignity and privacy is increased to suit the crime.

Tort is a breach of duty recognized under the Law of Torts. It includes that conduct which is not straight or lawful but is twisted, crooked, and unlawful. This branch of law consists of various Torts or wrongful acts whereby the wrong doer violates some legal rights vested in another person. The law imposes a duty to respect the legal rights vested in the members of the society and a person making a breach of that duty is said to have done the wrongful act .

http://legalservicesindia.com/

Indian Penal Code however, has already guaranteed certain Rights to safeguard women against the malaise of eve-teasing. As a women I think it is important that we know our Rights if we want to fight this problem head-on.

  1. Under Section 292, if a man shows pornographic or obscene pictures, books or slips to a female, he will be fined a sum of Rs.2000 with two years of rigorous imprisonment, if the offence has been committed for the first time. In the event of a repeated offence, the guilty will be fined with Rs.5000 and spend five years in prison.
  2. Section 354 imposes a two-year imprisonment with a fine when a person is found guilty of assault or using criminal force on a woman with intent to outrage her modesty.
  3. Section 509 punishes the “intent to insult the modesty of any woman by use of words, sounds, gestures, or the exhibition of any object in such a way as to intrude upon the privacy of a woman” with a fine and one year in prison.
  4. Under Section 298 A and Section 298 B of the Indian Penal Code, a man who is found guilty of making a female the target of obscene gestures, remarks, songs or recitation, can be imprisoned for a period of three months.

Although the fine and punishment sometimes feel too little to make-up for what we suffer, mentally and physically, it is at least a start. Do remember these Sections before you head out of your house next and Never tolerate ill-treatment, no matter how humiliating. Stand up for yourself if you want equality and respect.

P.S. A letter to the Chief Justice of India has been written to request a review of punishment for eve-teasing and other crime against women in the country and in hope of a positive response.