Posts Tagged ‘females’


This is the first story from my book ‘Steps’.There are eight  stories in all, all fiction and I will share my women and a part of myself through them here … with all of you. I hope you will find yourselves too somewhere. 

Uma- I wrote it as I waited to be called for an interview. I had nothing with me except copies of my resume and wrote in on the back of the three pages that make my resume. The director probably saw me scribbling away and asked me to show him what I was writing Outside. Hesitantly I showed him my scribbled story. He told me that though I was the most highly qualified candidate and would be offered  the job,  I should go home and write. I did.

UMA

Uma lay quietly, looking up at the soot darkened walls and the sunlight filtering through the dusty mesh. It made odd patterns. They reminded her of her daughter’s attempt at putting henna on her hands, as she had last week, on the auspicious festival of Gangaur. She raised her hands to see the discoloured henna, and rubbed them feebly together- blood on her hands.  What was wrong with her, why was she thinking of blood and death? She lay awaiting life- the birth of her child- her fifth child, child..??  After four daughters she awaited only the birth of a son, no longer of a ‘child’.

            Pain came stronger now, in waves, but Uma did not make a sound. She had screamed enough the past four times but the Gods had not listened, better to bear it. Oh! Why did she not have the optimism these other women squatting around her had? They seemed sure she would beget a son- the promised heir to the name and property. Property? The meager 2 acres left over from drink and gambling? He needed a heir for THAT? She laughed mirthlessly and her sister-in-law mistaking the sound for a sob, moved close, dabbing her forehead with her sari pallu.

            Uma looked into the face of her husband’s younger sister. She seemingly bore no resemblance to the young pretty girl she had been when Uma had entered the house as a young bride. Girls were not supposed to be happy but at least there had been hope and a vestige of a dream on her face. Five years of marriage had wiped out the wishes and dreams. Like the women around her, her face had only weariness etched in its lines now. Not grief, not desperation not even the death of her dreams – just weariness of life , of the constant compromise, the acceptance of the unaccceptable. They looked into each other’s eyes and shifted their gaze away, it seemed they both know the truth that they would have to face soon. Let’s leave it for now, their eyes said.

            Uma’s gaze went to the inner door where her eldest daughter peeped through, holding her sisters back, just nine years old and already a mother to her siblings. She remembered her soft words of yesterday as she rubbed her mother’s aching back and calmed her that it would be a son this time and how she would look after her brother and care for him.

            Suddenly Uma wanted it all to stop. She wanted to hold the little scrap of humanity safe in her womb forever and protect her daughter. To give birth would be to sentence her to the hellish life of her sisters, mother and generations of women. If… if she was allowed to live.

            She knew why the official midwife had not been called this time, knew the meaning of the cauldron of milk kept in a corner of the room. She averted her eyes, her heart silently screaming at her unborn child to remain unborn. She sobbed aloud as pain tore through her and the women in the room suddenly came to life.

Uma  lost herself in a world of pain and prayer, Later, there was an easing of pain and the cry of a baby, Uma did  not know how long or short it had been. She did not open her eyes, not wanting to look at the child who would soon be cruelly snatched away from her, and was not it better this way. She hardened her heart against the inevitable pain and horror.

Loud clanging and joyous shouts, she opened her eyes startled. She looked into the ecstatic faces of her mother and sister-in-law. ‘It’s a son’- she ran to break the news to her anxiously waiting brother.

Uma turned her face away to the inner door and beckoned her daughters to her, opening her tired arms to them. As they came in timidly, Uma’s face broke into a smile.

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News doing the rounds today.
  1. EXCLUSIVE: Uterus removal scam unearthed in Bihar
  2. Bangalore: Father poisons 20 day-old baby to death
  3. Media houses paid money to incite rapes, suicides: Mamata Banerjee
  4. Widow paraded half-naked in Bihar by her sons, daughters-in-law

If there’s a news/issue/event we need to be aware of, kindly send us links on @JusticeForWomen or our Facebook group.


Dear Son

What did we do wrong? We brought you up to be a nice boy.We gave you morals and values.
As a child you always came first in class, your mother used to prepare your favourite dishes. Your sister was not that good in studies but always helped around the house.
You were a bit naughty but that’s okay. Boys are a little naughty. Always leaving your clothes strewn around, your mother and sister were forever picking up after you. But you were not a bad boy.
Remember, you beat up that boy when you were in class XI because he teased your sister on the way back from school? You also got a cut on your cheek but we were proud of you.
What happened? Your poor mother is sick with worry, she is sure there is some story behind this.
When we saw your face on that video we could not believe it!
Please tell me it is not you tearing the clothes off that girl. Please tell me its not you, smiling, as he molests a young girl on the street. Please tell me I have not failed as a parent , as a father! Please tell me What did we do wrong
An Anguished father

I don’t want to write, not a single word.
I want to say that there is nothing more to be said, after the Guwahati incident.
But unfortunately, we will move on. Even this shameful terrifying incident will not change anything.
We will close this chapter and again read feverishly about girls getting scholarships, flying aeroplanes and breaking the glass ceiling.
We will want desperately to believe that all this is the truth and will lull ourselves into this belief.
For a while , till another ‘Guwahati’ happens.
Because it will.
And this time we cannot blame the government, too bad but there it is.
We have only ourselves to blame so naturally that door is closed, as we are cowards.
Mental cowards who cannot face the truth and physical cowards who cannot protect the weak.
Women are not weak per se I want to say this but can’t in all truthfulness.
Deterioration of status of women is being seen and felt by each one of us.
I have always maintained that the day is not far off when women will become commodities again.
Don’t think!
Don’t introspect!
Don’t analyse!
Just STOP accepting the unacceptable right now.

Otherwise be prepared for the return of auction block and sale of women as slaves.