Posts Tagged ‘government’


Guest post by a guy who believes you can be safe if you look at signs.

The government cannot make harsher laws to make you safe.

The cops cannot be more vigilant to make you safe.

There is only one person in this world who can make you safe. You are that person. Only YOU can ensure you are safe.

Here are some practical steps I have been sharing with my sisters. This is what I would like to share with you.

  • Be alert. Look for warning signs. Trust your instincts.

Is the area you’re walking through in the middle of the night really safe? Is the party you’re going to full of strangers exhibiting strange behavior? Is your boyfriend groping you without consent? Women know something is wrong about a situation even before they can really put a finger on what is really wrong about it. The tragedy is in not respecting that first thought you get.

  • Respect reality. Know the harsh truths about your surroundings.

Is your society ready for your freedom to wear what you wish to? Are people around you generally sexually liberated? Have the people you interact with been exposed to global fashion trends that not only tolerate but maybe even encourage the show of skin? It is one thing to say that you should have the right to wear what you want to, act friendly and intimate with anyone you wish to, etc. but a completely different thing to say that I will knowingly put a juicy chunk of meat in a pool full of starving piranhas and expect them to not pounce on it. Sure women’s rights activist will want to hang me for saying this, but to them I say just one thing – please live to fight the battle another day. What needs to be changed is the male mindset. If you truly want to win this battle, be prepared to fight a long and tiring battle. And prepare to live. Taking your chances out there on the minefield will not help.

  • Stand up for others in distress.

Are you the kinds who is holding a candle in one of the protests today but on some other day have quietly seen someone’s daughter or sister get eve teased or assaulted in public without helping them? Shame on you! If you really want to take a stand against assaults on women, that candle light vigil will do nothing compared to what assisting a woman in need can do. This really is the most under rated strategy to bring about a change in the male mindset. Show the males their disgusting attitudes will not be tolerated and you have a chance of curing them of their ill. Show them that the might of the decent folks far outshine the might of the disgusting folks and you have a chance to strike fear in their hearts the way no harsh law ever could. The domino effect of that act can ensure someone else who may target you in the future is already discouraged.

  • Learn self defense. Not just physical but mental and emotional too.

You think rape is only physical? You think it is just the body that gets violated? Wrong. The assault is always at multiple levels. And so should your self defense be. For times when all your precautions fail you, sure you should learn Judo, Karate or anything else you can enroll for. But also know that if, God forbid, the unthinkable happens, you are not the one at fault. You are not to be blamed. The shame must fall on the perpetrators of that heinous act. Don’t get into a cocoon and let those bastards walk free. Fight them. And the spineless others who might discourage you. They may have struck first, but you can still finish it!

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Let’s NOT Rest! Reach the Media

Posted: December 19, 2012 by Ankita in Helpful Links
Tags: , , , , , , ,

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Guest Blog post by @probablytrippy. This piece of writing is originally posted here & has been taken after permission. It gives details of all PR/Media contacts on Social networking sites and how few mins of our efforts can bring about a change. 

Rape in india is systemic – it is not a one off case here and there but a systematic abuse of women which can not be tolerated by any citizen.

Our individual anger will not make the government shift. We must make our voices heard, as one huge group. ANd we need to make sure the people who hear it can actually impact the national conversation.

One of the most important people our voice can influence is “Media”. Continual media coverage of rape in the country and systemic and judicial failures in addresing it will amplify our outrage, maybe even get the government to listen.

We will achieve this by (You can read the letter here)

–  continuous and vociferous communication of our anger to media decision makers and reporters using all social media outlets available to us.

– The demand for a specific publicly posted WRITTEN confirmation by a media channel to its viewers that a specific number of minutes in the newscycle to the heinous crime of rape, and to highlight points of systemic and judicial failures.

– The demand for specific publicly posted WRITTEN confirmation by a media channel to its viewers that special care will be taken with headlines/bugs/graphics that portray “woman as victim” rather than “man as violent aggresor”

If we get a critical mass in this, and the channel does not respond, we go on to step 2, hit them where it hurts, target their advertisers. And then, friends, they will have to listen.

But to get to step 2, we must reach a critical mass. We need to FLOOD their Facebook, their twitter, their websites, every place, with a CONSISTENT message, over and over again. Every day. They need to get hundreds

Below are some draft templates for tweets/FB posts/Comments that you can use. you can obviously change the wordings but DO remember to link back to our list of demands – i have kept them reasonable, actionable, and measurable – please lets not argue about whether it is enough or not – its a start.

Here is a list of mediafolk on twitter, to get you started

Twitter option (enough space to address @ someone)

FB post option/Comment option

You could also choose to simply share this post on your fb or twitter. all it takes is one click – surely you can do that much?


I don’t want to write, not a single word.
I want to say that there is nothing more to be said, after the Guwahati incident.
But unfortunately, we will move on. Even this shameful terrifying incident will not change anything.
We will close this chapter and again read feverishly about girls getting scholarships, flying aeroplanes and breaking the glass ceiling.
We will want desperately to believe that all this is the truth and will lull ourselves into this belief.
For a while , till another ‘Guwahati’ happens.
Because it will.
And this time we cannot blame the government, too bad but there it is.
We have only ourselves to blame so naturally that door is closed, as we are cowards.
Mental cowards who cannot face the truth and physical cowards who cannot protect the weak.
Women are not weak per se I want to say this but can’t in all truthfulness.
Deterioration of status of women is being seen and felt by each one of us.
I have always maintained that the day is not far off when women will become commodities again.
Don’t think!
Don’t introspect!
Don’t analyse!
Just STOP accepting the unacceptable right now.

Otherwise be prepared for the return of auction block and sale of women as slaves.


Guest Post by Abhay Chawla (journalist) on his 1st meeting with Sonali:

This was the moment I was dreading, coming face to face with her. I tried to mentally prepare myself for the meeting. From the photograph I had seen in the newspapers, I knew Sonali was badly burnt due to the acid attack on her but a flesh and blood meeting is different. Could she see? Could she hear properly? What would I say when I saw her? Where would I look while talking to her? These and other questions were running through my mind.

Sonali came into my life one morning recently, in the form of a story run by a major news channel. When she had been 18 years old, three boys in her locality in Dhanbad had thrown acid on her face. It was nine years since the day of the attack. The boys had been arrested and later freed on bail and the court case still dragged on. Meanwhile Sonali’s life came to an abrupt halt as did the life of her family. 22 surgeries later she is still nowhere with no governmental or organized help coming her way.Instinctively, I knew I had to do something for her. The best I could immediately do was to set up a Facebook group and appeal for monetary assistance. I figured relief and rehabilitation was the first task and for that money was important. This would ensure her surgeries carried on, and somehow I felt that it would show Sonali that people of the country cared and that she was not alone. By evening that day “Help Sonali Mukherjee from Dhanbad” group was 500 people strong and growing. Donations had also started coming in with people messaging their support and contribution.The next day I walked into the temple in south Delhi where she was staying. As I had already spoken to her she was expecting me. Sitting alone on a cot in a small shed at the rear of the temple she was staring at empty space. “Sonali!” I called out loud with gusto. “Bhaiya!” she answered in an equally upbeat tone, smiling and looking in my direction. For a girl who had gone through so much in such a short span of time, she was extremely cheerful and positive. We didn’t know each other, had never met earlier but we connected. Was it because of an earlier life connection, I wondered.

I looked at her and I think I was staring. The acid had eaten both her eyes and one external ear. Her face was being reconstructed with plastic surgeries. Besides this her hands and neck also bore the marks of the attack. Looking at her I felt anger and frustration with the system for not being able to ameliorate her suffering or to give her any justice. I felt miserable on seeing that in a big city like Delhi she didn’t even have a decent place to stay, and in spite of her story narrated by a prominent TV channel no organisation, corporate or individual had stepped forward to give her even a comfortable accommodation.

We talked and the conversation was easy. She told me of the various surgeries she went through and how she progressed since the day of her attack. The number of people she met and the assurances she received. I steered clear of the attackers lest old wound reopen, but told her about my innumerable students who had expressed sympathy and shared their pocket money. She seemed to lapse into deep thought. “I am so happy you came and when you tell me about sympathy and support from people, I feel energetic and want to continue my fight to live.” she whispered back.

It has been over a week. Donations are trickling in as are assurances and media people. She still has to get a decent accommodation or a proper road map for rehabilitation and a future. Meanwhile, a proposal to make acid attack a separate criminal offence punishable by a maximum of ten years and compensation for the acid attack victims by the government has been approved by the Union Cabinet. It is still a long way from being incorporated as a law and then we will have to see how the law is enforced. But the first baby step has been taken.