Posts Tagged ‘sexual assault’


An account by @itsFreelancer of the First self defense workshop organized by @JusticeForWomen in Chennai:

The first self defence workshop for women was organised by JusticeforWomen in Chennai on Sept 1 and 2.

It was the first step towards a greater good, towards creating awareness that you, yourself are responsible for your well being. In a country like India where we are taught to respect women from an early age, the contrary to it is much more rampant. Women are molested in public, in houses by their husbands or family relatives, raped, killed, teased everytime a girl walks down a street. And this will continue. No matter how many laws the government sets up, its not going to be completely eradicated. Today you’re safe, tomorrow you won’t be able to look at yourself in the mirror.

Its time to be prepared for such an eventuality.

Justice For Women’s first ever self defence workshop was held at 17th Avenue, Salzburg Square, Chennai. And 3 courageous women stepped up to take matters in their own hands. I salute them for their bravery, I applaud them for their determination.

Uday Dhanda, was the anointed instructor in the discipline of Krav Maga. For those who do not know what Krav Maga is, it is the only non-competitive martial art in the world. That means, there is no world tournaments held for this discipline. Its deadly and it gets the job done.

What was taught in the two days was just the beginning of what you can achieve. It’s time women realised they are not just a shadow in the world of men anymore.

Day 1 consisted of learning what to do with the situations every girl faces daily. What to do when a man advances on you, what to do when you know you’re about to be in danger. When you’re in such a situation, the first thing that comes is shock. Overcome that. Take control. And we’re here to show you how.

Weeping and crying out for help will not help you enough. These workshops teach you how to fight back. You do not need to be martial arts champion to save yourself. A clear mind and a good reflex is all you need. Plus the determination to not be used by others. What do you do when someone grabs your hands? No matter how much you try to break yourself free, you’re powerless when the attacker is a man with a better body strength. They teach you how to use your assailant’s body force to break free. You learn where to hit, what to do. One action may be the difference between life and death.

The girls who showed up were more than eager to learn. They listened and practised with such an intensity knowing that yes, this will actually help them from preventing an unpleasant scenario. Most of you, one way or another has been in such a place. The next time you find yourself in one, you can actually get the better of it. Uday taught how to hit the assailant and where to hit. You do not need to be a superwoman to make his ribs crack and break free. Remember, they’re not going to play nice. So hit back with as much as you can with a clear mind. The harder they fall, the better control you’re in.

The girls who took part in this workshop heard about it from Twitter and Facebook. I just wished others were brave and concerned enough to take part. Girls seem to have this mentality that nothing bad would happen to them until it actually does. Only then do they wake up.

What do you do when you’re being forced upon? Do you simply weep and hope that its over soon? Once you gave it, you can be pretty sure it will happen again. Uday taught the girls what to do in such a situation. How to use your body and prevent this scene. Its simple and its effective. And you do not lose your dignity. Sadly, Uday chose me as the puppet to be trained on and I can tell you, it hurts. Imagine how much the assailant would be hurt when you take control with force.

Day 2 involved about what to do when you’re choked or when someone comes at you with a weapon. Practice, practice, practice. A simple 1-2 day workshop will just give you an idea. I urge you to learn it properly.

Its sad to know that it took a girl being molested in Assam to wake up. Nevertheless, you’ve realised that its time to be stronger. If you want to be equal, you need to get a move on. I am a guy. And I’m sad to say that I’m more concerned about this than most girls for whom this workshop was meant for.

It is your life, do not give up so easily. Today you’re safe with your brothers, your father, your boyfriend. But they cannot be with you 24*7. I ask you to ask yourself, Are you really safe or are you still in your dream world thinking nothing bad would ever happen to you.

Remember, you’re not alone as long as you carry your strength with you.

Regards,
Freelancer

PS: Uday Dhanda is in talks to set-up bi-weekly self defense workshops. Those interested in joining, kindly call him at: +919884342334 or drop a mention @themadcurator

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Guest post by Saikat Kundu:

 

Sexism in India refers to beliefs or attitudes in India that one gender or sex is inferior to, less competent, or less valuable than the other.

Discrimination and violence against women is prevalent, and sexual harassment at the workplace and lack of education continue to be identified as major problems.

Gender inequality, which is the devaluation of women and social domination of men, still continues to prevail in India.

Women are usually deemed as dowry burdens, the weaker gender, and worthy of a lower social status compared to men.

This subject raises the cultural aspects about the role of a female child in society, what her human rights are as a human being and a number of sensitive issues.This issue is important because there is nearly universal consensus on the need for gender equality.. Gender based discrimination against female children is pervasive across the world.

Sex selection of the before birth and neglect of the female child after birth, in childhood and, during the [teenage] years has outnumbered males to females in India and also in countries like Pakistan, Bangladesh and South Korea .

As per ?? 105 women per 100 men in North America and Europe but there are only 94 women per 100 men in India and other Asian countries like China and South Korea.

Domestic violence against women in India is a big problem.

For example, a paper published in International Journal of Criminology and Sociological Theory shows that in 2007 there were 20,737 reported case of rape, 8,093 cases of death due to dowry, 10,950 cases of sexual harassment with total crime of 185312 A U.N. Population Fund report claimed that up to 70 percent of married women aged 15–49 in India are victims of beatings or coerced sex.

In 1997, in a landmark judgement, the Supreme Court of India took a strong stand against sexual harassment of women in the workplace.

The number of girls born and surviving in India is significantly less compared with the number of boys, due to the disproportionate numbers of female foetuses being aborted and baby girls deliberately neglected and left to die.

Compared to the normal ratio of births, 950 girls for every 1000 boys,most states of India, especially Harayana, Mumbai and even Indians in overseas, are not meeting the standard,supported by the steeper child sex ratio, which can as low as 830 to 1000 boys.

India has a low sex ratio, the chief reason being that many women die before reaching adulthood.

It is therefore suggested by many experts, that the low sex ratio in India are attributed by female infanticides and sex-selective abortions.

Even though gender selection and selective abortion were banned in India under Pre-conception and Pre-natal Diagnostics Technique Act,in 1994,the use of ultrasound scanning for gender selection continues.

Other institution effort,such as releasing advertisement calling female feticides a sin by the Health Ministry of India and annual Girl-child day, can be observed to raise status of girls ans to combat female infanticide.

Female feticide will decrease the population of female and further skew the sex ratio of India.

In 1961, the Government of India passed the Dowry Prohibition Act, making the dowry demands in wedding arrangements illegal.

In rural India girls continue to be less educated than the boys.

According to a 1998 report by U.S. Department of Commerce, the chief barrier to female education in India are inadequate school facilities (such as sanitary facilities), shortage of female teachers and gender bias in curriculum (majority of the female characters being depicted as weak and helpless vs. strong, adventurous, and intelligent men with high prestige jobs) The Prime Minister of India and the Planning Commission also vetoed a proposal to set up an Indian Institute of Technology exclusively for females.

Although India had witnessed substantial improvements in female literacy and enrolment rate since the 1990s, the quality of education for female remains to be heavily compromised as the country continues to hold greater value for male than female.


Following are some of the news items posted by members on our Facebook Group, Justice For Women

  1. Teacher gets jail for cutting girl’s hair 
  2. Indore man fastens wife’s vagina with a lock, arrested
  3. Guwahati case: The questions about the fateful night of July 10
  4. Minor Muslim girl gang raped in Mewat; culprits at large
  5. Assaulted Dalit woman dies at hospital
  6. Rescued from kidnappers, girl raped by cops in UP
  7. Sexual assault likely to attract life imprisonment
  8. YouTube unveils face-blurring tool

The more I read up on news about crime against women, in India or abroad, I can’t help but think where is this world going.

How can we make it stop? Can we at all make it stop? If we can, why don’t we? If we want to, what are we waiting for? Let’s do it!!