Posts Tagged ‘gang rape’


Navratri, a combination of 2 words, ‘Nav’ meaning 9 and ‘Ratri’ night is a 9-day Indian festival wherein 9 avatars (incarnations) of Goddess Durga are worshipped.

Durga is a Hindu Goddess of power/energy/force. She is divine warrior and has the combined energies of all gods. Goddess Durga was created to annihilate a powerful demon called Mahishasur who was awarded with the power that made him invulnerable to defeat from any male.

The festival of Navratri is celebrated with vigor all over India, mainly in North and West regions as well as in some Eastern states. For the first 3 days, avatars of Goddess Durga are worshipped, followed by worship of Goddess Lakshmi (Goddess of wealth) and finally worship of Goddess Saraswati (Goddess of wisdom).

On the 8th day of Navratri, a kanya pujan (girl-child worship) takes place wherein pre-pubescent girls are worshipped by washing their feet and traditionally, offering rice grains and new clothes. These girls are worshipped according to the philosophy of ‘Mahamaya’ i.e. the Ultimate Goddess, Goddess Lakshmi (Goddess of power). Another reason for worshipping young girls is because they are said to be the purest and most innocent. Feminine gender is at the core of universal creation which is what these girls represent.

In most families, this Kanya pujan is observed on Ram Navmi i.e. the 9th and final day of Navratri. This tradition is still prevalent throughout the Navratri-celebrating population and hordes of girls are ‘worshipped’ by each family in order to complete the Navratri pooja.

Let us now take a look at this celebration of womanhood throughout the country over the last 9 days i.e. from 11th to 19th April, 2013.

 

11th April, 2013 (West Bengal) – http://www.tibetsun.com/news/2013/04/11/monks-among-those-arrested-for-gang-rape-in-kalimpong

12th April, 2013 (Punjab) – http://www.dnaindia.com/india/1821724/report-man-rapes-ninety-year-old-woman-in-punjab

13th April, 2013 (Karnataka) – http://www.thehindu.com/news/national/karnataka/teenager-held-on-charge-of-raping-4yearold-girl/article4631013.ece

14th April, 2013 (Bihar) – http://articles.timesofindia.indiatimes.com/2013-04-14/patna/38528481_1_complaint-class-vii-student-ssp

15th April, 2013 (New Delhi) – http://www.ibtimes.co.in/articles/457069/20130415/11-year-old-raped-inside-bus-delhi.htm?cid=5

16th April, 2013 (Maharashtra) – http://www.hindustantimes.com/India-news/maharashtra/Woman-beaten-up-foetus-dies/Article1-1045222.aspx

17th April, 2013 (Goa) – http://www.dnaindia.com/india/1823530/report-school-going-girl-gang-raped-in-goa-five-youths-held

18th April, 2013 (New Delhi) [Kanya Pujan]- http://www.ndtv.com/article/cities/woman-allegedly-gang-raped-in-delhi-thrown-semi-naked-onto-road-355746

19th April, 2013 (New Delhi) [Kanya Pujan]- http://www.hindustantimes.com/India-news/NewDelhi/Candle-bottle-forced-into-minor-rape-victim-Doctors/Article1-1046989.aspx

9 days of Devi poojan or 9 days of devil worship.

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Paloma Sharma is a  student, social activist and active blogger at Going Bananas. At a tender age of 18, she is more aware about social issues than most people. Following is an article on bride trafficking in India, a little known, less talked about topic.

 

According to the nation-wide census held in 2011, there are 940 females for every 1000 males in India. While the figures at a national level are disturbing, the State of Rajasthan accounts for an even lower sex ratio of 926 females for every 1000 males. The difference between 926 and 1000 seems small at first. However, Rajasthan has a population of 68,621,012 out of which 35,620,086 persons are male and 33,000,926 are female. With the natural human sex ratio being approximately 1:1, it is found that 2,619,160 females are ‘missing’ from the population of Rajasthan.

In 2012 Rajasthan had 308 cases filed under the Pre-Conception, Pre-Natal and Diagnostics Techniques (PCPNDT) Act 1994 against sex-selection abortion, which was the highest in the country. However, according to unofficial estimates, 2,500 baby girls fall prey to female foeticide or infanticide every single day in Rajasthan. Though the grand old patriarchs of clans practicing femicide continue to pride themselves over producing only sons, their systematic, mass-scale  and merciless murders of their daughters are not only gross violations of a human being’s basic human right to life but they also present a predicament to the position of their precious sons in society. In a culture where marriage is seen as a universal and inevitable eventuality, the genocide of females leaves a significant number of men without partners; and so, the buying and selling of women as ‘brides’ prospers.

Bride trafficking is forced sale, purchase and resale of girls and women in the name of marriage. Girls and women are kidnapped or lured into bride trafficking and sold, raped and/or married off without their consent only to end up as a slaves and bonded labourers at the mercy of the men and their families, who have ‘bought’ them.

Bride trafficking is also commonly called bride buying – a strange term because despite their sale, these ‘brides’ are no commodities. They are real, living females who are victims of trafficking. They are just as human as any of us. How can anyone truly buy another living being?

According to Global Voices approximately 90% of the 200,000 humans trafficked in India every year are victims of inter-state trafficking and are sold within the country. The states of Haryana, Punjab and Rajasthan are major destinations of trafficked ‘brides’. It is hardly surprising that these states also account for the most skewed sex ratios in the country. Although the buying and selling of brides was a well documented historic practice in undivided India, lives of today’s trafficked girls and women are cloaked in secrecy because neither do they have a voice, nor do they have the social-mobility or resources to acquire one and raise it.

According to a 6 year long analysis conducted by Empower People, 23% of girls from West Bengal are trafficked. Bihar is next at 17% followed by Assam (13%), Andhra Pradesh (11%), Orissa (8%) and Kerala (6%).

Trafficked brides are known as Paro (outsider), Molki (one who as been bought) or Jugaad (adjustment). Majority of trafficked brides belong to scheduled castes, scheduled tribes or lower economic classes. Some of them are kidnapped, some tricked and some sold into flesh trade by their own parents or other trusted family members/neighbors.

Another way of selling women has recently come to light due to the ‘Baby Falak case’. Pimps and traffickers pose as grooms, marry women with less or no dowries and then sell them off to other men. Isolated from their natal communities, in an alien land with no rights of their own, these cross-state trafficked brides are easy for their ‘grooms’ and in-laws to control and exploit.

Sold into a deeply oppressive patriarchal society where defiance of the caste and gender hierarchy is met only with bloodshed and death, these trafficked brides are seen as a ‘dishonour’ to the family because their origins, (i.e., castes) are not known. According to ‘Tied in a Knot — cross-region marriages in Haryana and Rajasthan, Implications for Gender Rights and Gender Relations,’ a study funded by the Royal Norwegian Embassy, trafficked brides are isolated and humiliated both publicly and privately due to their castes and duskier complexions. Children born to these mothers are not accepted in the community and are taunted by peers. In what seems like an unending cycle, boys born out of such unions are likely to buy brides just as their fathers did before them. The fate of girl children, if any, remains unknown.

Although a trafficked bride is technically married to only one man in the family, the man’s brothers or other male relatives see her as a property to be shared. The Eastern Post reports that 70% of trafficked brides are gang-raped repeatedly on a regular basis by their husbands and other male members of the family. Sexual promiscuity among boys and men goes unchecked and is almost celebrated in such social environments where using protection is not the norm. Hence, trafficked brides who are sexually abused by their husbands or other men are at a higher risk of contracting HIV, as are any children born to them.

Trafficked brides are used as agricultural and domestic slaves by day and sex slaves by night. Their sole purposes seem to be that of managing the household, working in the fields and bearing a male heir for the family. If they fail in any of these tasks and their ‘owners’ are dissatisfied with them, they are resold; if they cannot be resold, they are kicked out of the house and forced into prostitution.

According to The Eastern Post 56% of trafficked brides have been sold twice, 21% have been sold thrice and 6% of them have been sold four or more times. However, according to Global Voices, the re-selling rate on an average is as high as 4 to 10 times for every trafficked bride and 83% of girls have been sold more than twice. Also, in 89% of the cases, the trafficked bride is the second, third, fourth etc. wife of her buyer. It is clear from these statistics that purchasing women in the name of marriage is not a traditional practice of lower-class communities (although they are starting to practice it.)

Bride trafficking is more prevalent in rich, land-owning communities. As seen in the census of 2011, the top 20% of the population have the worst sex ratio. Wealthy families see baby girls (and the dowries that go with them) as a threat to their wealth. This is why girl children are either eliminated as foetuses or as infants and the absence of eligible girls is made up for by purchasing trafficked brides. It is an unending cycle that neither society nor the government seems to be interested in breaking.

On the legal front too, hope for justice seems almost non-existent for trafficked brides. The ITPA (Immoral Trafficking Prevention Act) deals especially with prostitution but does not cover all forms of trafficking. The Bonded Labour System (Abolition) Act, 1976 does not cover this form of trafficking and slavery either. More over, sexual violence faced by trafficked brides amounts to marital rape which, despite the Justice Verma Committee’s suggestions and vehement protests by various women’s rights organizations, is not a criminal act in India. Although IPC sec. 366 seems like an effective way to tackle this mass abuse and rape of women and girls, it does not have a provision for rehabilitating victims of trafficking. Despite all this, the ultimate barrier is that trafficked brides are either illiterate or only slightly educated and have little to no knowledge of their own rights.

Trafficked brides are often child brides or very young women who are sold to older men. A majority of trafficked brides are between the ages of 13-23 years. A trafficked bride can be bought for as little as Rs. 1,200. They are confined to the four walls of the houses of the men who have bought them and have almost no social interaction with anyone else, even in their own homes. Neighbours often don’t know who the bride is, where she has come from or if she even exists. The state of anonymity that these women live in is not only disturbing but a cause for great concern.

If we do not know how many women are there, how will we know how many women are missing?

In the Mewat region alone, there are 20,000 cross-border brides. But that number is an unofficial estimate, just the tip of the ice berg and the ship that India society is floating on seems to be heading straight for it.

While urban citizens in general seem to be blissfully ignorant of the trafficking and slavery of women in the name of marriage, the government chooses to turn a blind eye. It would dare not defy the Samaj Panchayats and Khap Panchayats who, while worried about the ‘purity’ of their bloodlines, see trafficked brides as a necessity because for them anything is better than having a daughter.

It is these very Panchayats who hold the fate of politicians in their hands. Every time election comes around, these Panchayats declare the name of a candidate and the entire community votes for him/her. For the government, it would be disastrous to act against bride trafficking and lose a vote bank. After all, why is it important to uphold the human rights and dignity of these nameless, faceless women? Who are they? Do they comprise a vote bank?

No, they don’t.

A vote bank seems to be the only solution to this problem. If a vote bank is what it takes for the authorities to turn a blind eye to bride trafficking and simply shrug and say that marriage is a familial issue when confronted with realities, then a vote bank should be organized. Right-minded citizens who know their rights and care about the rights of others must come together and put gender equality and women’s rights on the agenda for 2014.

Bride trafficking is not just a woman rights issue but a human rights issue. Bride trafficking is not marriage, It is a lethal combination of the darkest forms of domestic slavery, bonded labour and sexual slavery. Bride trafficking is the ultimate dehumanization of a woman; hidden under colourful veils and disgusting excuses of men’s needs, a community’s honour and a family’s necessity. It is an inhumane custom of believing that someone can put a price on another human being’s life. This custom exists because we, as a society, allow it to. But we don’t have to let this go on anymore. Unlike the women who are stripped of their humanity and sold into a sick perversion of marriage, we do have a voice.

But the question remains: are we brave enough to raise it?


Guest post by @pentropy who is disturbed and ashamed by the recent Delhi rape incident. Read on to know how it’s not about the gender, it’s about the values.

When India won the world cup last year, there were tears in our eyes. We are a nation fond of our nationalism. Prima facie, we are known to love our country. We are all aware of a lot of things that needs correction, however, we still continue to take pride in most of the soft aspects like culture, heritage, unity in diversity etc and stay blindfolded of the hard facts. Fair enough! We want to believe that we are a ‘great’ country.

I personally want to be subtle about my sarcasm but I am not left with an option. The recent heinous gang rape of a girl in a Delhi bus by four men has shook me left, right and center. We are all aware about the intricate details of the crime committed and have shown our anger through the various channels, so I would skip them. But, more than anger, I am left with a feeling of vacuum and helplessness as an individual.

Being part of the ‘Shining India’ era of this country, I am a highly confident individual with great sense of belief in my abilities. I believe that I can do all that I want to and add my bit of positive push to the homo sapiens evolution process. I believe that during my lifetime, I will contribute to the world and to my nation and thus I will justify this great opportunity of being born a human. But alas, I am disappointed with myself!

This incident makes me shout for the criminals’ head, their castration, a quick punishment, a better law system etc. Fair enough, that’s what logically should happen. However, I am totally blank on the question – ‘But what should I do about it?’. Well, till yesterday, I felt like a change maker and felt like bringing a significant upward thrust to the world. Today, I feel absolutely spineless and realize that there isn’t anything I can do to control the imbibed negative energies in and around me. And I can’t deny their existence.  And I continue to stare in void – unaware and weak.

But that takes me to the greatness of our culture and heritage. It is saddening to see the hypocrite reality that we live in. Rape is an extreme case and thus calls for our sudden anger, but overall how sensitive we are to our surroundings define us. And I believe that we aren’t. The problem is that we live in the denial of being a nation that is individual driven and not society driven. Some European quoted that Indians focus of themselves much more than the country and its visible from the fact that they have their houses clean and roads dirty.

But in my heart I am ashamed. I am a male who has spent a large part in this part of country. I am one of them. Though I am totally helpless but I am sorry.

I don’t have the answers.


Post by Zena Costa, sports journalist:
Minor Abducted and gang raped in Goa
In a shocking incident reported at South Goa Town of Margao police station a minor girl was allegedly kidnapped and raped repeatedly at three different places in Porvorim, Panaji and Margao by three different persons between September 26 and October 13, 2012.
Margao police on Monday arrested two persons in connection with the case and hunt is on for two other accused. While Rumdamol-Davorlim resident Wassim Kalaigar, 20, was arrested under Sections 363 (kidnapping), 376 (rape) of the IPC and Section 8 of the Goa Children Act 2003, another Davorlim resident and ice cream parlour owner Raghavendra Pujari was arrested under Section 8(10) of Goa Children Act 2003 as the minor was allegedly abused within his premises located in Margao.
The 15-year-old victim, who resides within the jurisdiction of Margao police, has been rescued and sent to the children’s protective home, Apna Ghar, Merces.

Police sources said that on September 26, 2012, while the minor girl was returning home from school, an unidentified person forcibly took her to Panaji, and after confining her to his house in Porvorim for several days, repeatedly raped her. He later handed over the girl to another unidentified person who took her to Miramar beach and molested her. After confining her to his house in Panaji until October 13, he brought the minor to Margao and left her at KTC bus stand. Her sufferings didn’t end there.

While the girl was waiting at Margao KTC bus stand, Kalaigar (who has been arrested) made her acquaintance and enticed her to accompany him to an ice cream parlour. Once there, he too allegedly raped her inside a cubicle within the premises. Kalaigar then brought her back to KTC bus stand, Margao, and left her there. Battered, emotionally and physically, the victim boarded a bus and went to Panaji. Noticing her in a distraught and distressed condition, a couple took pity on the child and brought her to Margao by car and dropped her at her residence, police said.

Acting on a complaint lodged by the victim’s relatives on Sunday, Margao police booked an offence against all the accused. During the course of investigations, Goan NGO Bailancho Ekvott  (Women United) counseled the victim and assisted police in identifying the accused, Dy SP Mohan Naik said. Police said more details about the case will be known after the two other accused are nabbed. Margao PI Sudesh Naik is investigating.

This post comprises of rape news from all across the country. Newer news items on the top.

  1. Delhi: teen gang raped for a week
  2. RPF cop rapes 20-year-old at New Delhi railway station
  3. Widow stabbed, gang-raped at knife-point by 3 relatives
  4. Woman dragged into car in Kolkata and gang-raped
  5. Mumbai: Indian origin US national doctor arrested for raping married woman
  6. Delhi: 15-year-old girl abducted, sold and raped
  7. Three youths molest pregnant woman in bus; one held
  8. UP: 12-yr-old set afire for resisting rape attempt in Fatehpur
  9. Tamil Nadu: Doctor rapes 16-yr-old patient in semi-conscious state
  10. UP shocker: Doctors rape 32-year-old woman during treatment
  11. Delhi girl gang-raped in Faridabad, one arrested

Kindly keep us updated with more stories and articles on our Twitter account and Facebook group.